Gluten-Free Buckwheat Pancakes

Buckwheat is an awesome flour.  However, so many recipes for my favorite breakfast include wheat flour.  I’m not gluten-free, by any means, but it’s nice to have options to offer friends who need to be, due to health issues or just preference.

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I recently discovered Cassava flour.  Now, you should know.  If there is a flour that I haven’t yet worked with, I’m buying it.  I currently have 11 different types of flour in my house.  I use them all for different things.  I hope to give examples of recipes for you in later posts.

Back to Cassava, it is a tuberous root, that must be cooked otherwise it is poisonous.  (I guess you should not eat raw cookie dough with this product!).  It’s very processed, however, in order to make the flour and really does not have a lot of nutrients, other than a higher fiber content.  However, the plus side is that it is gluten-free!  I’ve had friends request my buckwheat pancake recipe, but I’ve had to tell them that it also contains wheat flour.  So, in honor of my gluten-free pals, here’s my adjusted recipe, now gluten-free!

    Gluten-free buckwheat pancakes

   Brush griddle with oil.  Heat until nicely hot.   

Whisk all the ingredients together until smooth.  Pour scant 1/4 cup of batter onto hot griddle, turning them when bubbles appear on their surface.  

Serve with whatever toppings you like.  I’m a gal who just like butter and nothing else, but you do you.

Extra pancakes can be frozen or kept in the refrigerator.

Unlike Amaranth, Cassava flour is very similar in texture to white flour and imparts no flavor, so I think one could use it in many recipes in order to convert them to gluten-free.  Buckwheat flour has a stronger taste and my family does not care for it, but I think it’s heavenly.  Of course, I’m right.

So that’s one more group of people that I can confidently tell,

Let me feed you!

 

 

 

Trying Amaranth

Do you have a list of foods to try?  You should!  Life is so interesting when you experience new flavors.  My list consists of a few new things, one of which was Amaranth.  Amaranth is not actually a grain, it’s a seed.  It’s an ancient one too, popular with the Aztecs.  Amaranth has many nutritional benefits, it’s actually gluten-free and protein-rich, not to mention high in fiber.  Most Americans do not get even close to the recommended fiber in their diets. 

You can use this flour by replacing 1/4 of your regular flour in recipes.  I found this recipe on the Whole Foods website. I made this Amaranth Banana Bread and it turned out great.

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However, if I’m going to be honest and of course, I am, the flavor is well, different.  Not bad, really, but it takes a bit of getting used to.  It’s described on sites as mild, sweet, nutty, and malt like .

I guess I’d agree about the malt-like, but I’d also add it’s a bit grassy tasting.  Like I said, not bad, sort of reminiscent of green tea. My husband, who is a fan of banana bread is not willing to try this one!!  However, I’m definitely going to try amaranth in more recipes.  The benefits of experimenting with different flours are many, so why not add some to your diet too?

Come on over and try my grassy, nutty banana bread!!  Tell me what you think and let me feed you!